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Cannabidiol (CBD) has been the focus of many medical cannabis studies, and continues to prove itself as a powerful anti-inflammatory drug. What makes CBD even more desirable for some patients is that it does not cause the psychoactive effects associated with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).   

Cannabidiol (CBD) is an exciting focus of medical research, popular media, and legislation related to cannabis. Its presence is becoming ubiquitous on the shelves of health food stores and search engine results for numerous medical conditions, but don’t believe everything you hear. While CBD is an incredibly safe and therapeutic component of cannabis, there are many myths and misconceptions associated with it. Let’s take a look at a few.   

Vancouver resident Carol Francey, 70, attributed cannabis use of more than five decades to her excellent health today. According to Francey, she smoked cannabis to alleviate various conditions such as arthritis, sciatica, and insomnia. Francey added that her previous medications used to affect her balance and slurred her speech. However, the use of various forms of cannabis proved helpful in relieving her conditions without the unwanted side effects from her medications.  

One of the effects of chronic cannabinoid use could be a more subdued response when faced with stressful situations, according to a new study published Psychopharmacology. Scientists from Washington State University found that when placed in a simulated stressful situation, those who regularly consume cannabinoids produce less cortisol, the body’s main stress hormone. 

When it comes to treating mental illnesses – especially depression – the options are unfortunately extremely limited. Most of the time pharmaceutical drugs can take weeks, if not months, before the patient notices a difference and oftentimes antidepressant medications are extremely addictive with a long list of potential side effects if you quit taking them suddenly. The worst part is that antidepressants only work for some people – at least 1 in 3 people with depression are unable to find relief through current antidepressant drugs.   

When scientists set out to study the effects that cannabis has on the brain, they made an exciting discovery. They discovered a system within the human body that had previously been relatively unknown. It became known as the Endocannabinoid System, taking its name both from the term cannabis and its active ingredients, cannabinoids.   

 As CBD, or cannabidiol, continues to sweep through the cannabis community, and studies continue to show the amazing benefits of regular CBD oil use, you’re probably thinking about trying it. While CBD continues to grow in popularity, the guidelines concerning its uses, benefits, and most importantly dosage, continue to remain critical questions in the realm of CBD use. So, it’s you want to start using CBD oil, and enjoying all of the amazing benefits, how much CBD oil should you take for an effective dose?

The world of medical cannabis can be daunting. With all of the new strains and products out there, how do you find the right one? Unfortunately, many medical cannabis patients have to do quite a bit of experimentation before they finally hit their stride. When it comes to pain relief, however, certain strains may be better than others. Here’s the scoop on which cannabinoid is better for pain relief, THC or CBD.

 The introduction of cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabis compound known for its ability to reduce chronic inflammation, alleviate seizures and increase energy, to the medical community has catapulted the reputation and applications of hemp oil for patients seeking natural forms of treatment.

It seems that CBD is not just an alternative, but also a healthy alternative, which is why so many people are choosing to use CBD products to treat a variety of ailments. That is just one of the findings of the largest survey on CBD (AKA cannabidiol), which not only found out that women were more likely than men to use CBD, but were also likely to drop their traditional medicine, too.